Socks for Dogs or Sustainability

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Can we put aside our fascination with Socks to become more sustainable in business?

The call and offer were a regular one – a content marketing company had just analysed my website and found it below par.  They could guarantee to deliver millions of leads and 1st place globally in SEO content – watch out the Cambridge Inst. for Sustainability Leadership!.  The marketing hook this time was a series of free searches to identify keywords.  As wet dark autumn afternoons working from home in the UK can be slow affairs, I decided to take up the offer.

The caller then started feeding back the monthly activity level in the UK arising from a specific keywords that I was interested in.  I was surprised by the overall interest levels from keywords associated with ‘Business and Sustainability’ so on my last keyword search I decided to set a baseline comparison keyword to compare previous results against.  An earlier online distraction looking for stocking fillers for the family may have influenced my choice.

Keyword Search comparison – results are average monthly inquiries made to Google  

Sustainability in business 101-200 Socks 11,500-30,300
Why is sustainability important in business 0-10 Socks and sandals 851-1,700
How to improve business sustainability 0-10 Bamboo socks 11,500-30,300
Role of sustainability in business 0-10 Socks for dogs 501-850
Business sustainability plan 0-10 Christmas socks 1,700–2,900
Benefits of sustainability 11-50 Vegan thermal socks 11-50
       

We’ve all have moments in our life when it seems that the world’s priorities don’t line up with our own.  In this case is was comparing the greater interest in ‘socks for dogs’ and surprisingly ‘socks and sandals’ (the latter a candidate for the return of capital punishment for social crimes) than the level of UK internet interest in how sustainability benefits organisations and business activities despite the strong evidence emerging globally.    

There is a visible upturn in business community interest into environmental stewardship affairs and the consequences of poor environmental management practices in areas such as single use plastics, energy management and recycling.   However in order to extract the greatest value from organisational initiatives, there has to be senior management commitment to greater business sustainability and a clear understanding of their role in leading the business towards greater sustainability as well as in promoting strategic change when sustainability opportunities, issues and risks arise. 

To achieve this, the surest route is through the exploration, and adoption of strategic sustainability business models within the business owners, leaders professionals.  Executive level decision-makers still lags far behind that of the wider environmental manager community in their understanding of future intangible risks associated with sustainability.

Professional development training and coaching can help break down these knowledge barriers, and allow an opportunity for more detailed examination of what opportunities exist and how the integration of a sustainability business model or strategic plan could fit your ‘future fit’ organisational culture.  The other great benefit is that it can allow time and an opportunity for senior managers to understand, reflect on and retain a stronger position when reviewing new initiatives arising within the marketplace – or within the minds of more junior colleagues who now hold an alternative worldview on business’s interaction with society.

Key message: Consider your future sustainability and leadership developmental needs in a key area of future business practice, and can Leading Green help you achieve this?.

On the socks front – am I a bad parent for even considering socks as a present, and is it wrong to feel that I have now at last discovered a Christmas gift for my eco-conscious, vegan and feminist elder daughter – and the dog!

Why I am tired of the statement ‘Our people are our greatest asset’

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People like plants need more than a basic environment in which to thrive

(2 minute read)

As soon as I see this statement in CSR reports, on websites and in marketing statements, I immediately dig deeper and look for positive proof that the statement can be backed up. I am often disappointed!

This phrase is at risk of becoming a modern day cliché, and any CEO tempted to use it should ensure that they have satisfied themselves:- firstly that the organisation has put a bit more thought behind the phrase than just good PR, and secondly that they personally have an understanding of organisational reality at shop floor or operational level.  In fact I often recommend to organisational leaders that they leave the safety and power-interactions in the C-suite and spend time regularly engaging with the workforce …… in listening mode!. Go out and listen to what they are saying, it can be tough but rewarding. Why? because it is common for less than 20% of a workforce to feel ‘engaged’ with the organisation and its existing leadership group.

Whilst it is without question important for employee’s to ‘hear’ a CEO express such a statement, it means nothing unless they ‘feel’ it in their employment or more importantly ‘know’ it in their interactions with their leaders and managers.  That’s the true route to having an engaged workforce. 

Sustainability means different things in different market sectors, but employee relationships are common to all businesses, and the way in which an employee feels they re ‘valued’ is not just a financial relationship. It can involve many tangible and intangible factors – the organisational culture, how the organisation aligns with their own beliefs and values, and the manner in which the business treats them and wider society – especially in the knowledge based or innovation driven employment sectors! This often determines whether the intangible factors of their goodwill, support, loyalty and ultimately presence are sustained or lost.

An active leadership approach to sustainability within organisations helps employees engage better with the organisation and to feel alignment with it. The best way to demonstrate ‘value’ (rather than state they are valued assets) is to explain directly how the work they are doing is appreciated and important to the business. Take time to research how their contribution fits into the larger picture, and by investing in their growth, engagement and satisfaction.

Reflection point: Do your employees ‘know’ and ‘feel’ your organisation’s core values, and are they aligned with your sustainability objectives?

 At Leading Green, our approach to sustainability in business training & consulting encourages our clients to look closely at their own internal leadership strengths and goals.  Helping them adopt an inquisitive state of mind and supporting them in how sustainability can support their long-term business strategy. 1